Majnun Ben-David
                     writer
#NewYorkerNote

New Yorker Note: Inventions

The New Yorker publishes a new short story almost every week, and I offer my thoughts on it here. Usually I aim to get my review up within a day or two of the story being posted, but I'm a little tardy (six days) with this one. Other websites that provide coverage of The New Yorker stories are The Mookse and the Gripes and Clifford Garstang.

This week's story is "
Inventions," a newly discovered story by the late Isaac Bashevis Singer, a Nobel Prizewinner. The story was originally written in 1965, translated from Yiddish in the late 1960s, and discovered in Singer's papers in the Ransom Center by David Stromberg. Click here to see the full post...
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New Yorker Note: The Breadman

The New Yorker publishes a new short story almost every week, and I offer my thoughts on it here. Other websites that provide coverage of The New Yorker stories are The Mookse and the Gripes and Clifford Garstang.

This week's story is "
The Breadman" by J. Robert Lennon, author of seven novels (Mailman and Happyland are two of the better-known ones) and numerous short stories. He is also a professor at Cornell.

Before we get into the review itself, I wanted to point out that the publication of Lennon's short story coincides with his launch of a new on-line literary journal,
Okey-Panky, under the auspices of the well-known Electric Literature. I don't know if the timing is intentional or coincidental [update: Prof. Lennon kindly responded that it was a happy coincidence], but I think it's great that the attention generated by a New Yorker story is being channeled toward the launch of a free online literary journal. Click here to see the full post...
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New Yorker Note: The Crabapple Tree

Among new short stories, those published each week in The New Yorker likely have the largest readership. My idea is to post a few thoughts on each New Yorker story as they are published. We’ll see if this idea solidifies into a weekly habit or dissipates into an “I-used-to.”

This week’s story is “
The Crabapple Tree” by the esteemed Robert Coover. Coover, who is 82, came out with his 10th novel in 2014, a sequel to his first novel, published in 1966. In between, he has written numerous short stories, co-founded the Electronic Literature Organization (“thrives at the intersection of digital media and [academic jargon alert] textuality”), and served as a professor at Brown University. He is known for metafictional takes on classic genres, as can often be seen from his titles alone (“Pinocchio in Venice,” “Noir,” etc). Click here to see the full post...
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New Yorker Note: The Ways

Among new short stories, those published each week in The New Yorker likely have the largest readership. My idea is to post a few thoughts on each New Yorker story as they are published. We’ll see if this idea solidifies into a weekly habit or dissipates into an “I-used-to.”

This week’s story is “
The Ways” by Colin Barrett, a relatively new Irish author whose first book “Young Skins” (a collection of short stories, natch) won the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. The book is available from The Stinging Fly Press in Ireland and will be published in the US this coming March. Click here to see the full post...
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New Yorker Note: The Start of the Affair

Among new short stories, those published each week in The New Yorker likely have the largest readership. My idea is to post a few thoughts on each New Yorker story as they are published. We’ll see if this idea solidifies into a weekly habit or dissipates into an “I-used-to.”

This week’s story is
“The Start of the Affair” by Nuruddin Farah, the celebrated Somali author perhaps best known for his Blood in the Sun trilogy. Click here to see the full post...
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New Yorker Note: Savage Breast

Among new short stories, those published each week in The New Yorker likely have the largest readership. My idea is to post a few thoughts on each New Yorker story as they are published. We’ll see if this idea solidifies into a weekly habit or dissipates into an “I-used-to.”

This week’s story is
“Savage Breast” by Elizabeth McKenzie, author of a novel and a story collection. Click here to see the full post...
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New Yorker Note: Reverend

Among new short stories, those published each week in The New Yorker likely have the largest readership. My idea is to post a few thoughts on each New Yorker story as they are published. We’ll see if this idea solidifies into a weekly habit or dissipates into an “I-used-to.”

This week’s story is
“Reverend” by Tim Parks, author of many novels and translations as well as several short story collections. Click here to see the full post...
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